Your Brain: Could It Be Something You Ate?

Health Tips / Your Brain: Could It Be Something You Ate?

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Sensitivity to certain foods or to food additives/preservatives are less common causes of brain fog, but certainly possible. So is hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar.

Food sensitivities If you believe that what you’re eating might be contributing to your symptoms, consider a three-week food sensitivity elimination eating program in which you eliminate one by one the most common trigger foods: dairy and wheat, followed by eggs, corn, and citrus. You can also try a detox, which can be relatively simple (mainly eliminating the foods listed above) or more complex and involved. A complete detox might include nutritional supplements (like UltraClear) to enhance the detoxifying systems in your body, colon cleansing, a liver flush, and even a visit or two to a sauna. An excellent food sensitivity elimination program, created by Dr. Alan Gaby, is available here. People who have the fortitude to complete the full three weeks often report improved memory and clarity of thought. You can also or ask your doctor to test your blood for hidden food sensitivities.

Food additives/preservatives You can easily avoid additives and preservatives by not eating most prepared foods. The vast majority contain them. Start reading labels. Better yet start eating real food like fruits, veggies, legumes, and lean protein.

Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is not a food sensitivity or allergy, but is definitely linked to focus and concentration problems. Your brain simply cannot tolerate low blood sugar. Ever know someone who literally gets irrational when he or she skips a meal?

To keep your blood sugar stable, eliminate most white-flour and refined foods (non-whole grain breads, pastries, cookies, cake, white rice, white-flour pasta) from your diet. They skyrocket your blood sugar before it crashes a short time later, leaving you hungry again. Refined foods act just like sugar because your body converts them to sugar so quickly.

Stabilize your blood sugar by eating actual food at each of your three meals. You can also eat smaller meals and graze in between on healthful snacks like carrots, apples, or a cup of oatmeal. Eating protein helps too.