Urine Therapy

What Is It?
Unsavory as it may sound to most Americans, urine therapy refers to the use of one’s own urine to promote or maintain health. Proponents of the therapy assert that a person’s urine can be swallowed, applied to the skin, injected, sniffed, or used as an enema, eye drops, or ear drops. While the use of urine for therapeutic purposes is regarded with great skepticism by virtually all conventional physicians, the therapy nevertheless has a long history in many countries around the world. The Greeks and Romans are said to have used urine as medicine, and the practice is common today in China and India.

Primarily composed of water, urine also contains small amounts of urea (a compound consisting mainly of nitrogen produced when the body breaks down protein), as well as vitamins, minerals, amino acids, salts, hormones, enzymes, and other organic and inorganic compounds.

Advocates of the therapy claim that urine also contains minute amounts of substances that may be connected to the body’s disease-fighting processes. These minute particles are mainly antibodies; the theory is that when the urine is ingested or applied topically, the re-introduction of these antibodies helps the body combat illness. In this way, urine is thought to have an immunization effect, similar to that of a vaccine.

Proponents suggest that urine can help treat a range of ailments, including colds, sore throats, asthma, allergies, skin conditions, ulcers, digestive problems, anorexia, alcoholism, and even cancer and AIDS. Topical application is also said to help relieve athlete’s foot and jelly fish stings.

Despite these claims, no controlled scientific studies have yet proved the effectiveness of urine therapy for any of these ailments. Indeed most Western doctors are particularly dubious about the immune-building argument, because stomach acid will destroy antibodies taken by mouth. Others suggest that any benefits reported are due to placebo responses activated by breaking the powerful psychological taboo of drinking one’s

How To Choose a Practitioner
Because urine therapy is self-administered, no practitioner is required. You may want to consult an Ayurvedic practitioner or naturopath to learn more about this therapy. There are also websites promoting its use.

Cautions
Urine therapy should never be used as a substitute for conventional medical diagnosis and treatment–especially for such serious diseases as cancer or AIDS.

Only your own urine should be used.

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