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Tag: athlete’s foot

Vitamin C

In the eighteenth century, seasoned sailors found that by sucking on lemons they could avoid scurvy, a debilitating disease that often developed during long voyages when fresh fruits and vegetables were scarce. When the lemon’s key nutrient was formally identified in 1928, it was named ascorbic acid for its anti-scurvy, or antiscorbutic, action. Today ascorbic acid is widely known as vitamin C.

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Tea Tree Oil

It was centuries ago that Australian aborigines probably first started plucking leaves from a native tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) to treat skin infections. In 1770, sailors from Captain Cook’s expedition to the South Seas ventured ashore at New South Wales and brewed a tea using the leaves of the same tree. This event engendered the herb’s English name “tea tree”–which is actually something of a misnomer because the Melaleuca species bears no relation to the Camellia species, the usual source of tea leaves.

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Pau d’arco

To treat a host of ills ranging from fungal infections to the common cold, traditional healers in South and Central America have long brewed a tea made from the inner bark of a native evergreen tree of the Tabebuia species.

Today, this healing brew, variously referred to as pau d’arco or Taheebo, is readily available in North American health-food stores and sold as a “cure” for cancer and numerous other ills (including diabetes, warts, and vaginal yeast infections). Whether pau d’arco actually works for any of these conditions is unclear and the subject of ongoing confusion and controversy.

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Goldenseal

The Iroquois and Cherokee were among the first of the American tribes in the eastern United States to use this small perennial plant (Hydrastis canadensis) medicinally. They harvested its fleshy underground stems (rhizomes) and roots and used them to treat a variety of infections and other complaints, from insect bites and digestive upset to eye and skin ailments. By the nineteenth century, healers began to refer to this native wildflower (which resembles a buttercup) as goldenseal because the cuplike scars on its bright yellow rhizomes resembled the wax seals then used to close envelopes and certify documents. The plant’s colorful roots also provided dye for clothing.

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Garlic

Along with its well-earned reputation for discouraging friends and repelling potential lovers, this powerful herb has a storied culinary and medical history. Egyptian pyramid builders took it for strength and endurance. Medieval healers recommended it as protection against supernatural forces–vampires in particular. The French scientist Louis Pasteur investigated its antibacterial properties, and doctors in the two World Wars treated battle wounds with garlic juice when other drugs were unavailable. Most recently, garlic has been touted for heart health as well.

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Calendula

Calendula, the garden plant known as pot marigold (Calendula officinalis), is nature’s remedy for many of life’s little accidents: sunburns, bruises, and scratches to name a few. Europeans have been using this versatile herb for centuries in cooking and healing. The yellow-orange flowers have anti-inflammatory and antiseptic actions–these have been demonstrated in laboratory and animal studies–which make the plant valuable for insect bites, athlete’s foot, and a variety of other disorders.

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Upcoming Workshops

**Functional Sport Nutrition: Decoding Your Personalized Path to Wellness and Optimal Performance
Olivia Wagner
Thursday July 19, 6:00 – 7:30pm
Fee: $35 

Planning to run a 5 or 10k this summer? Are you training for a marathon? Want to improve your energy and performance at the gym or in a favorite sport?

Just as each individual responds differently to training, each person requires individual nutrition approaches.

In this work shop you will learn real-food nutrition strategies and functional medicine tools to support.

Space is limited and registration is required.
Please register online or by calling (773) 296-6700
More>>

 

**Shamanic Gathering: The Power of Summer as an Ally for Healing
Katie Oberlin, HTCP

Thursday August 9, 2018, 6-7:30pm
Group Session – $55 registration

From a shamanic perspective, the South is related to Summer, midday, a time of power and activity, and supported by the Earth element as a container for our lives.

Learn how to work with these energies to support your intentions for healing and living in alignment with your life purpose.

Space is limited and pre-registration is required.
Please register online or by calling the Center at (773) 296-6700
More>>

 

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July Sale: 20% off Curcumin Supplements

Turmeric extracts and curcumin products are popular and potent anti-inflammatory supplements. For the month of July, both Theracurmin HP and CurcuPlex-95 are 20% off in the Apothecary.

As always, we recommend you check with a physician before beginning any new supplement. Because curcumin is contraindicated in several conditions, please consult with a healthcare professional before adding this to your regimen. More>>