2265 North Clybourn Avenue    Chicago, IL 60614    P: 773.296.6700     F: 773.296.1131

Arthritis in Your Knees

Click here for the original post.

You may not have a problem with arthritis in your knees now, but if your mom or grandmother has knee pain–or you yourself do–you might want to read this.

Osteoarthritis is the wear-and-tear form of joint breakdown, as opposed to an inflammation in the joint, like rheumatoid arthritis or gout. Osteoarthritis is by far the most common form of arthritis, and your chances of being affected increase as you get older. Your risks increase if arthritis runs in your family, if you’re overweight, or if you’re inactive.

Conventional treatment for arthritis (especially of the hip and knee) are, to put it charitably, unsatisfactory. The NSAID group of medications, like ibuprofen, can damage both the lining of your stomach and your kidneys. Physical therapy is OK, but sometimes the recommended routines can actually stir things up and make symptoms worse. Cortisone injections are temporary and can weaken the bone. Joint replacement works (I have a metal hip myself), but given our preferences, most of us would like to avoid surgery.

An interesting article in the December 11, 2006, issue of Archives of Internal Medicine actually gave an approving nod to alternative medicine. Working with 68 patients being treated for arthritis of the knee, the authors prescribed twice weekly massage treatments to half of them (reduced to once weekly after four weeks) and no therapy to the other half. After the allotted number of weeks, the two groups exchanged places, the “un-massaged” now receiving therapy and the others no massage. Understand this was full-body classic Swedish massage, and not just confined to the knees. Sessions were one hour long.

The results were terrific. Massaged patients reported less pain, less stiffness, better overall function, and improved mental attitude. Even after the eight weeks, both groups reported that the good benefits lasted as long as several months.

If you are persistent, you can get your health insurance company to pay for your massage. Get a prescription from your doctor. Have her re-phrase “massage” as “myofascial release therapy,” state clearly the number of sessions needed, and the duration of each session. I believe insurance companies bristle at the word “massage” because they equate it with “pleasure” and they don’t think insurance should cover anything remotely pleasurable. (This is why, say, major surgery or chemotherapy generally gets reimbursed without question.)

You can also help your arthritis using natural products (which also got a thumbs-up in this same article). I’m convinced that my own regular use of glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate allowed me to postpone my surgery for ten years (click here for the product I use). Instead of the stomach-chewing anti-inflammatories like ibuprofen, I also recommend CTR Support, which contains natural anti-inflammatory herbs like devil’s claw and turmeric.

I’m always cheered when a stodgy conventional medical journal has something positive to report about alternative therapies, so I thought I’d share it with you.


Join our Newsletter

Get health recommendations, delicious and time-saving recipes, medical news, supplement reviews, birthday discounts, and more!

BIRTHDAY

Health Tips

Dr. Edelberg’s Health Tips contain concise bits of advice, medical news, nutritional supplement and pharmaceutical updates, and stress relief ideas. With every Health Tip, you’ll also receive an easy, delicious, and healthful recipe.

When you sign up to receive Health Tips, you can look forward to Dr. Edelberg’s smart and very current observations arriving in your in-box weekly. They’re packed with helpful information and are often slightly irreverent. One of the most common responses to the tips is “I wish my doctor talked to me like this!”

Quick Connect

Get One Click Access to our

patient-portal

The Knowledge Base

Patient education is an integral part of our practice. Here you will find a comprehensive collection of staff articles, descriptions of therapies and nutritional supplements, information addressing your health concerns, and the latest research on nutritional supplements and alternative therapies.

Join our Newsletter

Get health recommendations, recipes, medical news, supplement reviews, birthday discounts, and more!

Upcoming Workshops


**Winter Solstice Celebration: An evening of Acupuncture and Shamanic Healing
Tuesday, December 17, 5:45–7:30pm
Hosted by Katie Oberlin, HTCP and Mari Stecker, LAc

Course Fee: $75.00

Take a break from the hustle and bustle of the holiday season to enter the stillpoint of the Winter Solstice, reflect on the lessons of 2019, and set intentions for the new year. This will be an evening of individual and group healing, ceremony, and celebration. More →

Recent Health Tips

  • Preparing for the Wuhan Coronavirus

    Seems like only yesterday, though actually it was 2003, that a viral infection called SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) meandered around the world after starting at a live animal market China. For those affected, what first appeared to be an especially bad cold quickly became something ominous, progressing to a potentially fatal pneumonia. Ultimately there were 8,098 cases of SARS around the world with 774 Read More

  • Infertility Issues? Start With The Guy

    I’ve lost track of the number of couples we treat at WholeHealth Chicago who are involved in one of the hormone injection/surgical procedure stops on the conveyor belt of infertility centers. Currently, it’s estimated that 15 to 20 percent of couples are struggling with infertility, half of them due to male factors. The infertility docs are nice enough and certainly well-meaning, but I note a Read More

  • Issues with Endocrinologists: Thyroid Approaches and Big Pharma

    My beefs with endocrinologists pretty much center on how they manage thyroid gland concerns, though they rarely win prizes for managing adrenal issues either. I don’t know any endocrinologists personally and rarely refer my patients to them. Occasionally, a patient with newly diagnosed hypothyroidism (low thyroid) will want to confirm the diagnosis with an endocrinologist. I suggest she prepare for a scolding if she’s taking Read More

Join our Discount Program!

Member benefits include 10% off all your purchases. Low, one-time membership fee of $25 ($35 for family).

MORE INFORMATION