2265 North Clybourn Avenue    Chicago, IL 60614    P: 773.296.6700     F: 773.296.1131

Women, ADD, and the Drugs That Help

In my last couple health tips we’ve been discussing Claire, a woman in her thirties with attention deficit disorder (ADD). Last week we reviewed Claire’s non-medication approach. This week, I’ll go over the conventional medications used for this very common condition.

Let me start by saying that untreated ADD in children can prevent very bright kids from living up to their potential. With ADD meds, there’s no “lifetime commitment” or even the need to take a pill every day. Children with ADD often skip their meds over summer vacation or on weekends if there’s no homework. Many adults with mild ADD use the meds on an as-needed basis.

By far the largest group of medications for ADD are the stimulants, literally “waking up” the inefficient ADD brain by boosting levels of the neurotransmitter dopamine. The two stimulants are the amphetamines (Adderall, Vyvanse) and methylphenidates (Ritalin, Concerta) and they’re all available in extended-release form, lasting (not surprisingly) a little longer than a school day.

Keep in mind that the average age of the people taking any of these meds is about 11.

All the stimulants, taken in the morning, begin to work within an hour and start fading in the late afternoon. People with more severe ADD often take a second dose mid-afternoon to last them until about 9 PM. The main side effects are jitteriness (resolved by reducing the dose), insomnia (ditto), and appetite suppression (goes away in about two weeks). I generally start my ADD patients on Vyvanse because it has a very smooth effect, with a subtle onset of action and gentle decline in the afternoon.

I reserve the single non-stimulant ADD medication, Strattera, for patients who report not feeling well on the stimulants, or those with a history of anxiety whose symptoms might worsen if stimulated.

The best description of Strattera is “subtle.” There’s no epiphany like that experienced by someone with ADD given one of the stimulant drugs for the first time. But there’s such a difference between that effect and the non-stimulant effect of Straterra that when patients switch from the first to the second, they’re often convinced it isn’t working.

Strattera requires patience.

It works by slowly increasing the brain’s level of norepinephrine, which, like dopamine, can enhance focus and concentration. It usually takes a month to appreciate Strattera’s effect, but once in place its two main advantages are: no stimulant symptoms (some people just feel physically uncomfortable taking stimulants) and it works around the clock. You’re just as focused at 8 AM as at 8 PM with one capsule a day. The main side effect, stomach upset, can be completely prevented by taking Strattera with food.

The natural therapies Claire had been using were helping a little, she told me, but she was curious about how she’d feel without any ADD symptoms at all. After some discussion, Claire chose Vyvanse. I also recommended two books: Scattered Minds for her and Is It You, Me, or ADD? for her husband. The second is an excellent book about living with someone who has ADD.

Claire was back in a week to talk about what she’d experienced. “It’s amazing,” she began. “I now know what memory is. I can read lists and two hours later, recite the list. I actually read a whole book, cover to cover, and can tell you what it was about. It’s like my mind was given eyeglasses.”

The big test, she said, would be the following month when she’d be re-taking her real estate license exam, which she’d failed twice in the past.

Although she kept in touch by e-mail regarding some minor Vyvanse dose adjustments, it wasn’t until one of her e-mails held photos of a condo she “thought I might be interested in” that I learned the ultimate results of her treatment.

Posted in A, Blog, Knowledge Base, W Tagged with: , , ,
2 comments on “Women, ADD, and the Drugs That Help
  1. Judith Allison says:

    Thanks so much for your excellent articles on adult ADHD. It’s a disorder that often doesn’t get serious recognition. Especially, thanks for recommending “Is It You, Me, or ADD?” To my knowledge, this is the only source written for the spouse of a person with ADHD. The family dynamics are hugely impacted by ADHD and this book could be a lifesaver.

  2. Gina Pera says:

    HI Dr. Edelberg,

    Thanks for mentioning my book, Is It You, Me, or Adult A.D.D.?

    Many partners of adults find it a very helpful guide. But just as many adults with ADHD are fans of the book, because it’s the only book to explain many of the subtleties of Adult ADHD (including the “emotional baggage” often carried by late-diagnosis adults), the medication protocols that help to assure good outcomes, the characteristics of therapy that is helpful for ADHD (and the type of therapy to avoid), the full diagnostic criteria (current and that proposed by Russell Barkley), and much more.

    Thank you for being an “early adapter” of ADHD.. I know you’ve helped so many adults with ADHD and their partners with an integrative approach to healing.


Leave a Comment

In Archive

Quick Connect

Get One Click Access to our


The Knowledge Base


Patient education is an integral part of our practice. Here you will find a comprehensive collection of staff articles, descriptions of therapies and nutritional supplements, information addressing your health concerns, and the latest research on nutritional supplements and alternative therapies.

Join our Newsletter

Get health recommendations, delicious and time-saving recipes, medical news, supplement reviews, birthday discounts, and more!


Upcoming Workshops

The Next Lyme Academy Begins
Tuesday, October 4, 5:30-7 pm
Here’s a special invitation for patients of Dr. Kelley who are currently being treated for Lyme disease. Dr. Kelley’s new, four-week Lyme Academy starts on October 4, continuing over the following three Tuesdays.


Awakened Body, Quiet Mind
An innovative workshop series for relieving mind/body stress and tapping into your true power and natural health.
4 Group Sessions with Meghan Roekle, PsyD
Four meetings using a unique combination of embodiment meditation and mental inquiry for deep healing.
Thursdays from 6:00-8:00pm; beginning October 20th

Recent Health Tips

  • Tired All The Time? Useful Info and Two Supplements

    Tired All The Time? Useful Info and Two Supplements

    As you might expect, fatigue is a fairly common reason people visit doctors. Feeling tired is vague symptom and can be linked to dozens of possible diagnoses, plus there’s a need to differentiate between physical fatigue and mental fatigue (brain fog) or consider both. When …Read More »
  • Invasion of the Body Snatchers!

    Invasion of the Body Snatchers!

    I’d been reading Ally Hilfiger’s new autobiography Bite Me: How Lyme Disease Stole My Childhood, Made Me Crazy, and Almost Killed Me, preferring the Lyme parts to those devoted to fashion and her MTV “Rich Girl” series. Her symptoms were typical of chronic Lyme and …Read More »

October Sale: 20% Off Urban Moonshine Products


All Urban Moonshine products are 20% off for the entire month of October!

Urban Moonshine creates beautiful herbal formulas that focus on prevention, improving quality of life, and empowering people to create home herbal apothecaries.  More>>